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with the chairman of the california state board of equalization, jerome horton. mr. horton, california has recently changed how it manages or its taxation policies when it comes to the internet, hasn't it? >> guest: yes, peter, it has. it broadened the definition of what's taxable in california to include online retailers who meet certain criteria. >> host: now, you said you've broadened. how was it before, and now who is included? >> guest: prior to the law, the sales tax didn't apply to companies that had affiliates and worked through various different groups here in the state of california. the law broadened the definition of who actually qualifies to include those individuals. so now online retailers who have affiliates in the state of california who also have some form of brick and mortar either directly or indirectly working through other groups and partnerships and so forth have nexus in california by the definition of california law and, therefore, are required to collect and report the use tax to the state of california. companies that are now included would include amazon, best buy and wa
that had affiliates and worked through various different groups here in the state of california. the law broadened the definition of who actually qualified, to include those individuals. so, now, online retailers who have affiliates in the state of california, who also have some form of brick and mortar, either directly or indirectly working through other groups and partnerships and so forth, have nexus in california by definition of california law and, therefore required to report and collect the use tax to the state of california. companies that are now included would include amazon, best buy, and wal-mart, that are making sales online. there are other criteria you have to make a million dollars, i believe in total revenue, and ten thousand dollars a year to california consumers, something along those lines. >> now, mr. horton, how much in revenue does the state of california expect to generate through this new taxation policy, and what's the rate of taxation? >> peter, the rate varies, depending on the definition, where the product is delivered, but it's somewhere around 9.75%. the to
and that a life can in turn shape history. in warren's case he was formed by early 20th century california and came to embody its values. he then explored those values to the nation and, to a remarkable degree, those values help shape our lives today. so if you will bear with me, i'd like to talk a little bit about who earl warren really was, and in the process i hope to paint a more accurate picture of this very consequential man. earl warren was born in 1891 in los angeles where i live today. in those days it was a scrappy little mexican-american village in a very young state of california. although warren's family left los angeles when he was still quite young, there were two memories of his youth that remained with him throughout his life and that helped form the man that he would become. the first was his recollection of a young neighbor who was crying in pain as she died from a disease, probably polio or meningitis. and he wrote in his memoirs, quote, her anguished cries and the sobs of her family gave me a lasting impression after her death. he was similarly affected by the mob in 1
seth rosenfeld report on the fbi's covert actions at the university of california berkeley in the 1960s. the of the reports the j. edgar oeuvre lead agency attempted to weaken activist student groups including the free-speech movement. this is about an hour and a half. >> my name is low bergman. i am the david logan distinguished prof. of investigative reporting at the graduate school of journalism at the university. on behalf of the journalism school, i want to invite all of you to what i think is an extraordinary special event especially for me personally. tonight we have the honor of having seth rosenfeld here. and went on to enjoy a long career as an executive career at the san francisco chronicle, and i stayed in touch with him all those years. going on for years. for all that time, seth was involved in his own personal quest for the question of what was really going on here at berkeley in the 1960s one of those events were taking place. the result is this book, "subversives: the fbi's war on student radicals, and reagan's rise to power". it is an extraordinary book. when i read it
is michael berman? >> michael berman is a person who handles redistricting in california. he's a democrat and his brother howard berman, was a member of congress, and he had an organization called the ad campaigns so it was his job to draw the map in california. he did a couple things. one thing he did was his brother's district he dropped it from 45% latino down to 31% latino, his brother would be safe and wouldn't face a challenge in the democratic primary by a latino candidate. another thing he did is got democrats and republicans together to pursue incumbent power so in other words sometimes we see these gerrymanders meaning one part is trying to pick up as many seats as possible, in california in that particular year basically the democrats get together with the republicans and they said let's not push for party gains but preserve our own seat and focus on incumbent gerrymandering and draw districts that benefit us so we are not challenged. that's burma. >> what role to the computers play in the current election system? is it good or not so good? >> computers are a tool so i think th
>> next, seth rosenfeld reports on the fbi's covert actions at the university of california berkeley in the 1960s. the author reports that the j. edgar hoover-led agency attempted to weaken activist student groups including the free speech movement. this is about an hour and a half. >> good evening. my name is lowell bergman, and i'm the david and reva logan distinguished professor of investigative reporting here at the graduate school of journalism at the university. um, and on behalf of the journalism school and university, i want to invite all of you to what i think is an extraordinary, special event, especially for me personally. um, tonight we have the honor of having seth rosenfeld here who's an alum of the journalism school as well as the daily cal and went on to enjoy a long career as an investigative reporter at the san francisco chronicle. and all that time -- and i stayed in touch with seth all those years, i've known him for at least 30 year, going on 40 years -- and for all that time almost seth was involved in his own personal quest for the question of what was
. as the mcgill is a lender near disneyland in california. >> they would give a sense of asset size so people can understand how this shouldn't have meant anything yet it ended up being consequential. >> was a tiny fraction of the assets of the acquisition of as an afterthought so this company made subprimal loans, it made mortgages to people whose credit was not that great and wamu's thinking of the time was we have these requirements under the community reinvestment act and that is saying that you are basically required to make loans to these people in this capacity and some prime lending could become popular in the 90's because the prime loans were not making that much money anymore. so one of wamu's chiefs went out looking around for a good sub prime linder and landed on long beach mortgage and it was the least dodging of all of the subprimal lenders he could find because there's shady stuff going on in the companies and so began the the playing this lender in the 90's and they broke away from what they had been doing originally. >> what was it about long beach that would begin the cancer tha
the right to go to the pacific. calling for a state of south california. would the south secede if its demands weren't met? would the federal government fight back? nobody knew. could northerners be made to stem the flow of fugitive slaves? those weren't academic questions that were tearing the country apart in congress, and the senate, 15 free states matched evenly against 15 slave states, giving the south virtual veto power over any legislation that even remotely seemed to threaten slavery. california, californians, 200,000, people fled to california during the gold rush. very quickly they demand admission to the union, as a free state. which will tip the balance in the senate. abolitionists are battling slavery advocates over the expansion of slavery elsewhere in texas, and is the most likely ignition point, is claiming the entire vast new mexico territory, which is far vaster than the present-day state of new mexico, and threatening to carry slavery across it at gunpoint if necessary, raising troops to do so. and the civil war had begun in 1850, it wouldn't have been in charleston
and november 6th. earlier this month several candidates faced off in a debate for california's 26th district seat left open by the retirement of republican rules committee chair david dreier. this hour and a half long debate between julia brownley and republican tony strickland took place at california lutheran university in thousand oaks. [applause] >> moderator: okay, here we go. um, we have as dr. kimble had mentioned, we have c-span, we also have kdtv, kclu and ventura county star all live streaming, so the debate starts at 7:15. so let me quickly go through the ground rules. we flipped a coin to determine the order in which there would be opening and closing remarks and who would start and who would finish. in the opening two minutes from each candidate, it would open with assemblywoman brownley, and then that would close with senator strickland, and can that same -- and that same, then it would be reversed in the closing. it would be senator strickland and then assemblywoman brownley. once we go through the two-minute opening, then a panel, tim hearth and henry durbroff and i will pres
that we think of as the great plains and the rocky mountains to california. that did not include california. it was already a state to. the question was critical because it had to do with the future of slavery and seven powerpc in the nation. -- southern power in the nation. what is there constitutional rights as citizens? moving slave property into territories owned by the entire nation. the dread scott decision the united states supreme court confirmed the southern constitutional view. republicans will allow no more slaves on any territory. abraham lincoln elected november much later in est. congress came into session and to put forth a critical portion a way they dealt with the territory to have a dividing line beyond the louisiana purchase to the border california. i will get to my main topic. when abraham lincoln and rejected all meaningful compromise. i am going to talk about three different men. you know, his name. abraham lincoln. the other two not so well known. a great kentucky statesmen some would believe henry stewart from your state to have prior to the nomination o
with the soviet union, so states like mississippi, states like georgia, texas, florida, southern california, arizona and north carolina are all being transformed in the post-world war ii period by this historic shift in population. just think about it. this period from 1964 to 2008 can be thought of this kind of the period of sunbelt dominance in the american presidential history. if you think about it, every president elected from 1964 to 2008 comes from a state of the sunbelt. lyndon johnson from texas, richard nixon from california, gerald ford was not even elected vice president. he was from michigan. jimmy carter from georgia, ronald reagan from california, the first george bush from texas and bill clinton from arkansas and the second bush from texas. so 2008 is in some ways a watershed election it's in being the four-year period of sunbelt dominance. there were issues that were critical in the politics that developed, they came out of the sunbelt and they tended to have a conservative back to them. they tended to be oriented around history of strong national defense, of an opposition
chance for the future. >> host: next call, dave in cortez, california. hi, dave. >> caller: oh, hi. this is cortez, colorado. >> host: oh, sorry about that. >> caller: oh, okay. out here in colorado we're going to have an initiative on the ballot, and it's been put on there to legalize hemp. and i was wondering what, how you feel about hemp, and before the 1930s we used hemp for a lot of synthetic products until the petrochemical industry decided they'll make a lot more must be by abandoning it. so i was wondering if we are as a country we start making synthetic rope instead of polyester, we'd start using it for food, fuel and fiber. >> host: we got the point, dave. thank you very much. >> guest: i don't have much expertise on hemp, but one of the areas we were talking just a moment ago about research, one of the questions is biofuels and the ability to make the energy we need, some part of it, out of biological material of some kind or another. and that's one of those examples where a lot of work is going into it. it turns out to be a harder problem than people thought. it's takin
progress in houston, atlanta, charlotte, california, north texas and right here in metropolitan washington, d.c. and more regions will follow. we've learned lessons from the past regarding our larger acquisition programs and we've developed best practices moving forward with elevated and strengthened our nextgen organization, and we've created a new program management organization specifically focused on implementing major technology programs. such as aram which is our modernization program. this will strengthen and improve the coordination among the nextgen initiatives assuring them from the drawing board to live operation. this new approach as well as our improved working relationship with the union is already showing results. aram is already operating and nine en route centers of the country. we plan to use it at a total of 20 centers. and now five centers are using it as the primary technology to direct air traffic. this sets the stage for taking advantage of more capabilities throughout the air traffic control system. this is truly an exciting time in aviation history. nextgen is fund
today as the great plains, the rocky mountains and west of the rocky mountains to california. didn't include california because california as you know was already a state. question was so critical because it had to do with the future of slavery, and the future of southern power in the nation. now, southerners demanded what they saw as their constitutional rights as american citizens to take their property, including slave property, into territories owned by the entire nation. in 1857, in the famous or infamous dred scott decision, united states supreme court confirmed the southern constitutional view. republicans in contrast, never, no matter the supreme court. republicans would allow no more slaves in any territory. abraham lincoln was elected in november 1860. a month later, the united states congress came into session. members of congress put forth various compromise proposals, a critical portion of all in some way dealt with the division of the territory. most often their was a proposal to extend some kind of dividing line, westward beyond the louisiana purchase all the way to
of maintaining a dynamic industry. so part of the reason that i went to california is to understand what drives innovation and investment in this industry, but also to hear from them about ways that washington could be more engaged to make sure that our decisions, you know, both reflect the nature of the business and help them do what they do even better. >> host: final question, eliza krigman. >> let's talk about the politics at the fcc. do you feel any pressure to be more conservative than commissioner mcdowell, and do you consult with one another about a team approach on the issues? >> guest: i don't feel any pressure one way or the other. i can tell you we've never had any conversation like that, nor have i had a similar conversation about small p politics with any of my colleagues. it's remarkable how well we work together. the vast majority of our work is done on a bipartisan, consensus basis, and when we do have concerns, tease are issues where reasonable people can disagree, and we approach the disagreement in that way. and so i've been very fortunate to have four colleagues who are ble
settled. california in a few weeks as an initiative on the ballot that would make the golden state are right to work state, meaning it would eliminate these agencies fees paid by non-members. michigan has an amendment on about the we try collective bargaining rights in the state constitution. these debates are alive and well. what we're going to forget today's to to get which part of the reform coalition is right on this issue. should reformers work at the state level to curtail collective bargaining rights, to make teacher strikes illegal, to turn every state into the right to work state for these agencies that are not allowed? so to debate these issues with to opinion makers in the community. we are doing this town hall style by the way just like last night with a presidential debate. hopefully, i don't want is you guys standing up and coming to blows. i think many of us thought that perhaps the president and the governor going to start punching each other. i don't want to see that kind of behavior. so first up we have joe williams was the executive director of democrats for educ
and texas and florida and southern california and arizona and north carolina are all being transformed the the post-world war ii period by this historic shift in population and political influence. think about it. this period from 1964 to 2008 could be thought of as kind of the period of the sunbelt dominance in american presidential history. you think about every president elected from 1964 to 2008 comes from a state of the sunbelt. lyndon johnson, from texas. richard nixon, from california. gerald ford was never elected so he doesn't count. he was from michigan. jimmy carter from georgia. ronald reagan from california. the first george bush from texas via connecticut. bill clinton from arkansas, and the second bush from texas. so 2008 is in some ways a watershed election and ends the 40-year period of sunbelt dominance. there were issues that were critical in the politics that developed, that came out of the sunbelt. they tended to have a conservative cast. they tended to be oriented around issued of strong national defense, of an opposition to unions and a defense of free enterprise
to the idea is. >> i met him many years ago added event of the diversity of southern california and one thing led to another i started to work at "forbes" in the puerto rico department. >> your practical experience how do you reject that how capitalism will save us? >> when i was at "forbes" i learned a lot about the market. and worked many years ago but working as an entrepreneur you really need to have economic freedom that is something i learned personally. if you just get a paycheck you don't understand how government can affect of small business and a job creation. that led me to think this is a useful idea for a book. >> host: how do you see the role of government the role of congress in the economy? >> we need government to create a stable environment to function and create jobs. government and its decisions are driven by politics. markets are driven by companies who meet the real world needs of people. you need government to protect us from fraud and from two words. but overly metals some government goes too far and use the press job creation and. >> the 2008 financial situation and b
industry. so part of the reason i went to california is to understand what drives innovation and investment in this industry, but also to hear from them about ways that washington could be more engaged to make sure that our decisions, you know, both reflect the nature of the business and help them do what they do even better. >> host: final question, eliza krigman. >> let's talk about the politics at the fcc. do you feel any pressure to be more conservative than commissioner mcdowell, and do you consult with one another about a team approach on the issues? >> guest: i don't feel any pressure -- [laughter] one way or the other. i can tell you we've never had any conversation like that, nor have i had a similar conversation about small p politics with any of my colleagues. the vast majority of our work is done on a bipartisan consensus basis, and when we do have concerns, these are issues where reasonable people can disagree, and we approach, you know, the disagreement in that way. and so i've been very fortunate to have four colleagues who are blessed with both deep understanding of communic
the california primary. then at the end of august, democrats manage chicago. cbs and nbc provided full coverage of both the republicans conventions, the bbc decided to give on the evening wrap ups. they hired korbel to deliver 15 minutes of commentary each night, and occur in the conservative point of view was william f. buckley. the editor and founder of the national review had established himself as the spokesman of american conservatism, author of god and man at now and other books have also had a syndicated newspaper column, on the right, and tv show, firing line. erudite and unearthly communist in his first elaborate breathy deliveries, manic eyebrows and reptilian, will. he is now remembered as a representative image when conservatives can be consider race, but buckley was ahead of his time in many ways. his exchanges during the republican convention in miami were testy, but with that seriousness sat. tv journalists, howard k. smith served as moderator. buckley support the war in vietnam, but i'll post it, but to demand that the republican nominee, and nixon. he was so excited i the gover
. in states like texas and california, that proportion's even greater. in texas 48% of the entire population under 18 is latino. in california 51% of the entire population under 18 is latino which explains why our electorate is growing as young people turn 18 years of age and enter the electorate. oops. like to talk a little bit now about the impact latinos will have on congressional races. first, there are two latinos running for the united states. in arizona, former surgeon general richard carmona is facing congressman jeff flake to succeed senator jon kyl. the former surgeon general actually has, i think, pretty good opportunities to be successful on november 6th. it's a race that's being watched nationally and may increase the number of latinos in the united states senate. in texas former solicitor general ted cruz has excellent opportunities to be elected on november 6th, becoming the first hispanic to represent hispanics in the united states senate from texas. in the united states house, there are currently 24 latinos serving the u.s. house of representatives. two are not running for r
, andy. and he came here from california. he is an author and an ex-police officer. he trains dogs. this is bruno, a 4-year-old german shepherd. hughes trained to -- cocaine, meth to ecstasy. don't worry, you are all safe. while andy is making his comments i'm going to make a few practical comments to you about training, about breeding and how police dogs are purchased and how little departments get dogs that don't work in big departments use them to do illegal searches all the time. andy go ahead. >> i haven't been on the hall listening to all the folks talk about the docs. knowing i'm coming from the opposing side in a sense, you know they properly selected dog who was well trained is very reliable. i know there are a few cases out there just there are doctors that are no good and politicians that are good and maybe even some attorneys aren't good. they make mistakes or do things in the wrong order. in other words use a dog. a dog is really only supposed to be used to find the odor and leave the further evidence that would later on lead us to the vehicle. i have been a police off
campaign financing. >> so you're looking at california right now, and that massive increase in the cost of gasoline, when matt said, when consumers are paying for gasoline they are not able to purchase their basic commodities every day. so what's happening? governor brown is proposing a relaxation of regulations that impact the energy industry. that is clearly a concession that regulation drives the cost of energy. we've got to have that same focus and discussion here in washington. because what's happening in california can happen all across this country. >> hawaii, i heard -- >> when we do the big deal everybody thinks we have to do entitlements and defends on one side and taxes on the other. if you have a school pashtuns do with two legs he usually falls over. if we look at what the canadians did with their cash cow, we have more cash cow in energy than any of them. and we can do spending. we can do taxes, and we can to energy which is our cash cow if we go to and you can make a real deal. and i -- >> tom, you think this can happen if the make of government on november 7 is the same
and a talk about california being an example of a future that none of us want for our country. they said we don't have to look at greece or spain, just look at california. so we know what lies ahead if we don't get our act together. and i think, i think there's a constituency and i think it's all about leadership. as a former governor, i make him it was just not the case that i could go to the legislation to i consider my ideas, legislators, i hope you can give me something that will work. leadership starts at the top in an organization. the chief executive has to lead. >> we've seen and we saw in this conversation here, an unwillingness for both sides to move off of their points. we've seen over the past few weeks a lot of talk about going over the cliff. we saw schumer last week start to throw some cold water on avenues that have been viewed as, or potential around these issues. are you reading this as an inability to advance the ball? >> i certainly hope senator schumer was a one off for purposes of the fall campaign, and that that is an action way things because that was very unhelpful
, reporting on the largest manhunt in modern california history. booktv visits the united states naval academy. politics, history, and war will be covered. visit booktv.org for a complete schedule of this week's programming and watch as all become weekend long on c-span2 and a booktv.org. up next, dakota meyer talks about the battle in afghanistan and his efforts to rescue soldiers that were ambushed by taliban forces. dakota meyer became the first living marine to receive the medal of honor since the vietnam war. this is about 45 minutes. >> i would like to welcome everybody. this is my official welcome. we are honored to have you here today. we are part of an elite club of authors. there are many that are active here in the american legion post the other thing i want to mention is each of you have a card that looks something like this. several years ago, we began a program called support the troops. the weather was books or dvds or even ipods, batteries, some of the things that they let us know that they needed, and we collected a few boxes and sent them to the troops. each year it has gotte
to outfox this massive high-tech posse and as they said the biggest manhunt in california history which involved the fbi and the dea and thousands of cops and i'm not exaggerating, on foot and it on horseback, mounted posses, civilian vigilantes or go people were all over. this was very brutal and it had all these wild west frontier elements. it's not typical that one man was able to outfox this kind of a posse of these days. so that is what was going on as i got into the early days of the manhunt for "rolling stone" and then after i finished my piece which took two years to write, i realized that the story needed to be a book and so here we are. so i will tell you a little bit about it as i go through and then answer your questions. this is from a strange request. alone in a small trailer donald charles cook had been singing a song. it was a pretty song or was it a song that the casual passerby would hear on the off chance that he or she was in the vicinity of the remote little abode. it was a weird so weird and discordant toot emanating from the trailer, always calling, calling, calli
and texas and florida and southern california and arizona and north carolina are all transformed in the post-world war ii period by this historic shift in population and political influence. i mean, just think about it. the period from 1964 to 2008 can be thought of this kind of do. if sun belt dominance in american presidential history. when you think about every president elected from 1964 to 2008, comes from the state of the sun belt. bennett johnson from texas, richard nixon from california, gerald ford was never elected, not even vice president come as a guest account he was michigan. jimmy carter, ronald reagan come the first church veteran texas va connecticut. bill clinton from arkansas and the second bush from texas. the 2008 is a watershed election. it ends his 40 year. if sun belt dominance. and there were issues that are critical in the politics that develop, that came out of the sun belt. they had a conservative cast to them. they tend to be oriented about strong defense of an opposition to unions in defense of free enterprise politics. and also from the sun belt in the south an
but brought him out with the bohemian grove. so there was this bohemian grove in monte rio, california. i actually worked on another story about the bohemian growth, so i know the place well. if a man's club, all men. two dozen men getting together at a summer camp and they do it every year as there was the bohemian club in san francisco at posted this confab of corporate decision makers, government luminaries, diplomats, very, very important people. probably the equivalent today of at some of the big events that happened in aspen when you see folks in short sleeves kind of rubbing elbows with each other. so jackson was coming out in august of that year to do that. and so, his professors said first, which eucom? there's a groundbreaking of the law school, which you can speed? and then the professor surprise to rehnquist by saying i'm going to arrange for you to make an aired the interesting thing is that rehnquist gave me 10 and met with jackson and jackson just didn't even really interview him. rehnquist had a swedish ancestry, which was kind of a talking point of his always. and so, jac
illinois to missouri to texas to california. she helped out banks when times were bad, and they were in trouble. she was the largest individual lender to new york city government. she lived in the guilded age when society lived ravishly, but she rebelled against it. she lived in simple life. she loved her children and friends. she was weary of those who befriended her for her money. she showedded her dog great affection, and when she was asked why, she said because he doesn't know how rich i am. [laughter] she lived her life as she deemed best. she forged the path for women to have business careers and be mothers, and through her clever investing, she showed women were the equal of any man. at her death, newspapers around the world, around the world, proclaimed her the queen of wall street, and it was known throughout that she was the richest woman in america. there are lots of sayings in the back of the book, her words of wisdom that i think are great follow-up. she did have a goodceps of humor, and she was one smart lady. if you have any questions, i'd love to try to answer. yes? >
, eddie -- [speaking spanish] and she happened to be living in the village of joshua tree, california, at that particular time. and there's a whole set of circumstances that led her to, you know, who's from a -- she's from the tropics of central america, you know, how did she wind up in the december merit everybody has a story out in the desert of how they got there. she said, ruben -- [speaking spanish] we'll take care of you, we'll give you a place to live. and shortly therefore i arrived in the desert, and one of the first things i saw when i rented my little shack out in the sand next to a sign that said next services, 100 miles, the town of 29 palms east of joshua tree, i saw myself driven to go further and further out. eddie and her friends were in the village of joshua tree which was right at the edge of a beautiful -- you guys know joshua tree, right? u2's album, at least. crazy arm like that. [laughter] well, i wanted to go further out. there was something existential that was driving me further and further out into the big empty, as they say in the desert. and also the furth
california sacramento was broken in. with every single tax. [applause] citic this crowd is not need to be reminded. [laughter] but the tax is there bowed against every single one. the last thing sacramento needs lose more money like giving heroin to a junkie. >> how do we by media? >> of also like to comment on the public-school to produce useful one's. liberal send their kids to the lily white private schools. but who always fights the vouchers to the and a male? al gore was asked in harlem when he was running for president because he was the democrat won a black reporter said if you are so big on public-school is not having vouchers why your kids go to private schools? typical move he got angry and said don't bring my children into this. wait a second. [laughter] not so fast. it is a great idea for conservative billionaires' i love fox news but why is that the only game in town? ten times the ratings but it has not occurred to cnn and msnbc they have higher ratings maybe we should try to be fair and balanced. [laughter] that seems popular. by the way a small point*, i am doing pie
are we getting together, billionaires and millionaires because if you change california , which is broken, broken, please vote against every single tax. every single one. [applause] please vote against it every day. >> i don't think this crowd needs to be reminded of that. the mac ann, vote against every single one because the last thing sacramento needs is more money. it's like giving to a junkie. their herald tribune is server your organization. had we been media comest wallpapers,, large papers. >> i'd also like to comment on your taking of the public schools and actually producing useful once. liberals don't favor that, but they send their kids to private schools, so it doesn't really matter to them what happens in the public schools. who is it that's always fighting the vouchers to the nail? al gore was asked in a debate in harlem when he was running for president he conceded and, of course, are beholden to the teachers union. and so i black out reporter patents editor so big on the public schools and spend them money of the book schools and i have a vouchers student budgeting system
of california. the place where you are in the know. i am dug sovereign political reporter at kcbs radio in san francisco and i will be a moderator for this evening's program. please insure your cell phone, pda and other noisemaking devices are turned off for at least on silence. and we will get underway in just a moment. first i'd like to tell you about some upcoming programs. this thursday, september 27, melanie, financial commentator for abc's good morning america, and paul schott stevens who is the ceo of the investment company institute will team up to discuss the future of retirement in this daunting economic environment they will stick to the current crop of retiring baby boomers and give saving strategies for the younger generation for those golden years far ahead. this will be a new program this is thursday year the commonwealth club in san francisco. tuesday october 2nd former connecticut senator chris dodd will be here in his new role as the chairman and ceo of the motion picture association of america. he will address how last technology has moved entertainment content to the cloud
in california when you are making baskets but this is the way the internet was built and the way the web was built and the lot of technology underlying the entire world was built. we can now point to that collaboration sometimes called your production, the structure of the peer network and say it works. it build things that are globally important and have transformed the world. >> host: what connects them? you wrote in "future perfect: the case of progress in a networked age" to via pier progressive is to believe in the power of markets, to be a pier progressive is to believe the key to continued progress lies in building your networks in as many regions of modern life as possible. with a need arises in society issued building peer network. >> guest: peer progressives believe in the power of markets because when it works well is it a decentralized course. this is a principle that i take very seriously from a libertarian school of thought which is that a decentralized system will outperform a top-down conceptually planned system. this is an insect from the austrian economist hayek. the wo
. it makes sense that california, the republicans really are going to be trying to mobilize because it gone. obama is going to win california. so it makes sense that even the short term or maybe the longer-term, that if you change to redirect those systems have republicans will trying to find more posts in the suffers would yield more vote, so you would have a higher turnout rate, which is presumably one of the goals here. and okay, maybe. but the problem with cases there is an academic study actually a phase, a swedish economy in the electoral college, and into president, and eight, he published an article in the american economic review and amazingly had found exactly what john and npv have been talking about, which is a database going back in time about presidential visits to states and that he was able to model looking forward up till that time, 22,008, he modeled what would be the difference. you know, we didn't have any direct presidential election system, but he was able to model with this database would have been like had we been in mexico. that he was able to compare to the modelin
, in california, 51% of the entire population under 18 years old is latino. which explains why our electorate is growing as young people turn 18 years of age and enter the electorate. i would like to talk a little bit about the impact of latinos will have a congressional races. first, there are two latinos for the united states senate. [inaudible] in texas, former solicitor general has excellent opportunities to be elected on november 6. becoming the first represent texas as a hispanic. in the united states house, there are 24 latinos serving in the house of representatives. two of them are not running for reelection. charlie gonzalez is retiring from congress. el paso was the primary race. of the 22 latinos are running, many are running for reelection and have excellent prospects of being reelected. or they are being challenged by other candidates who also are hispanic. there are five new people who will join the congress on november 6. it will be an increase at minimum -- a net increase of 27 latinos and it united states house. those who are most likely to be elected in november include ton
to me tonight from mississippi and california. you've come a long way to honor and celebrate the media research center. i can tell you that i am so thankful for your being here, for brent bozell, kim grand, his entire team. it takes a huge effort and phenomenal team to do what they do a daily basis. and branch, i am and not of what she's done over over the last 25 years. thank you. [applause] time to have that golden anniversary. a lot has been said recently about media bias. brent got a great gift a few days ago when even the gallup organization announced the results of this most recent poll, that 60% of americans view the current media landscape as either untrustworthy or biased. 60%. and i think to [speaking in native tongue] , of course. i mean come even democrats know that most of the guys who work for the mainstream -- so-called mainstream or dinosaur media outlet or democrat. the few studies have been bandon overwhelmingly prove that. i think wait a second, george stephanopoulos, former clinton operative. i've been on "good morning america" within. he could be nicer to me, but w
so much and they included a box of chocolates. of course the chocolate company in california. but the irony is he had a system making sure there were refreshments and things to keep him happy on the top of that list and then the letter here from orrin hatch indicating his admiration and respect for michel's participation in the community is of course on the other side of the aisle from the papers that certainly is a period in time where there is considerable collegiality on politicians regardless of their political beliefs. he is a loyal alumnus and he comes to the defense occasionally. he's provided considerable support for the history project and he has delivered the address from time to time. he does not have a position and does not teach class's but when he comes he visits the class is particularly in the government affairs department whenever he's on campus to come and speak to those students, and i think it is really a terrific experience for them and a great opportunity for him. after he retires in 1995, he has a private life is in equally distinguished. he is appointe
in california many years ago. but before that, he was a roarer, and he drank just an enormous amount. and as people who drink a lot do, he would, not infrequently, get himself into trouble. and one time one of his early wives--he used to get married a lot, too--kicked him out of the house, we assume for good cause, and he went over to stay with a friend of his. but his friend was, in turn, out drinking. bob couldn't get into that apartment. but he spotted his friend's car in the alley behind the apartment. so he opened the back door and crawled into the backseat and fell asleep in the backseat of the car. he woke up the next morning and the car was being driven down the highway by a total stranger. it was not his friend's car at all. and there was bob in the backseat, thinking about how to handle this. and, finally, he just sat bolt upright and said to the--into the driver's ear, 'hi there. i'm bob bullock, your secretary of state.' poor man almost drove off the road. c-span: is that a true story? >> guest: that's a true story. c-span: he's still lieutenant governor? >> guest: he's s
the state that had the single most subscriptions was california and in fact its success was the reason that it failed. when the postal rates -- they changed from a straight rate to a regional rate. it became entirely too expensive to mail something from augusta to california, so that made a huge difference and that is eventually what killed it. the other interesting thing i want to mention today was myron avery. myron avery, the history of the operation trail and myron avery are completely intertwined. you wouldn't have per trail without avery. benton mackay was the person who wrote an article in the 1920s saying, there should be a trail that you could walk from georgia to maine to see the whole country. myron avery is the person who went out then and built the trail, who walked it. he was the first person to walk the length of the trail. he was in maine native. his family background was in sardine canning which of course was a huge industry in maine in the early 20th century. but he loved the woods. he became an attorney and a captain in the navy and did admiralty law for a living, bu
california, and his son, donald kueck by then, was teenager, and pretty well known -- actually kind of notorious singer. was in a lot of bands, and a longtime junkie and when he and his father reconnected they decided it would be a good thing for father and son to kind of continue this to see where the spark went, and he moved out to the desert for a while to live with heir father, donald kueck, and he sed up shop in -- one of the things that don did out there in his compound was he acquired all this flotsam and jetsam and would barter and trade for neighbors for things he needed and they needed, and he'd fix up old cars and van. and he had this old van on his property that they labeled the anarchy ban, and joe would go in there and get high. and listen to music and sometimes don would go in and hang out with him, and the friends would come out and make music, and it was boys together running around in the desert. kueck was a brilliant self-taught rocket scientist who beyond to hob nobody with the engineers at edwards air force base so he and his friend would run around sometimes in
't been a the university of california, berkeley. yes a ph.d in political science from princeton university. he is author of many books on the topic of chinese politics including nationally acclaimed rediscovering china commandant amos and the limits, reform from 1997. he is currently working on another two books, two at the same time. that takes a lot of talent and time. one is called chinese politics, and the other, middle-class, pioneering chinese global integration. not an exaggeration to say that dr. li is the steps foremost expert on china politics but we're very pleased to have them here. we are also pleased of doctor christopher yung. doctor young is a senior research fellow at the esta for national strategic studies at the university. doctor young is the author of the book entitled china's -- that was published in 2010. chris has a ph.d international relations at the school of advanced international studies. he holds a masters degree in east asia china studies from the same institution. will then turn to dean cheng. he has been our senior fellow for china political secur
a case out of california, and that is much more a challenge to whether the protection clause allows the expansion of same-sex marriage. it is very much like loving persons virginia in can the state's ban this? are the states allowed to ban same-sex marriage? the doma case, the defense of marriage act case, is a lot easier for the supreme court because it only, it applies in spades that already had same-sex marriage. so they are not imposing same-sex marriage on other states. i actually think they will take the doma case and they will declare it unconstitutional because it is really manifestly unjust. the government has a very hard time explaining why the government needs to do this. i mean, what interest is served by penalizing married couples who happened to be of the same sex? the proposition eight case is a much more dicey proposition, because if the court, if the case goes up in its current form, and there are ways they could matter what, but if it goes up in the current form it basically is, must the 44 states that don't have same-sex marriage start allowing them? that would be
is in a place called matzo rio california. i've actually worked on another story about the doheny and grove so i know that place well. it is a men's club, tall men, 2000 getting together at a summer camp and they do it every year. there is a boeheim em club in san francisco that hosted this concept of corporate decision-makers, government luminaries and diplomats. very important people in and probably the equivalent today of some of the big events, when you see folks and shirtsleeves rubbing elbows with each other. so jackson actually was coming out in august of that year to do that. and so, his professor said first he asked jackson would he come to the groundbreaking of the law school and then the professor surprise rehnquist by saying i will arrange for you to meet him. the interesting thing is that rehnquist did meet him and he met with jackson and jackson just kind of didn't even really interview him. rehnquist had a swedish ancestry, which he had talked about a lot and it was a talking point of his always. so jackson got off on this tangent of talking about his swedish clients that he had a
, the state with the most subscriptions as california. and in fact, his success was the reason it failed. when the postal rates, they changed from a straight rate to a regional rate, it became entirely too expensive to mail something from modesto to california. so that made a huge difference and that is eventually what killed it. the other interesting thing i want to mention today was my rent a very, the history of the appalachian trail admiring a the are completely intertwined. wouldn't have the trail without avery. brett mckay was the person who wrote an article in the 1920s saying there should be a trail that you could walk from georgia to maine to see the whole country. myron avery is the person who built the shrill, watch potrero, he was a maine native, his family background was in sardine canning, which is course is a huge industry and main in the early 20th century. that he loved the woods. he became a maternity and cap been in the navy. that's spent according to one source at 250 weekends a year working on the trail. he was headquartered in maryland, so he found the potomac appellation
that the lovely utopian idea and i'm sure that will work well in your commies to mourn for the california when you are making baskets. .. differ from traditional libertarians, we don't don't think markets self every problem in society. they are not solved by markets and markets create their own problems and prone to bubbles. in the intervet, there are a lot of companies trying to build a global network that would kind of unite computers all around the world. compared to open source pier produced solution of the internet itself and the web and now wikipedia and many other things. there are places where you can use decentralized structure without involving traditional market relations, and that is what pier progressives are trying to do. >> host: what is the chicken gun? >> guest: okay, so the book starts with this kind of opening preface about progress, society and inability to, understand, you know, extent to which progress is happening all around us and misinterpret it, misinterpret where that progress comes from. the example. astonishingly safe to fly in a commercial airplane now. just this extr
was the bohemian grove in monte rio, california. i actually worked on another story about the bohemian grove, so i know that place well. >> host: men's club. >> guest: right. it's a men's club. it's all men. 2,000 men getting together kind of at a summer cache, and they do -- camp, and they do it every year as -- there was a bow hemoyang club in san francisco, and it hosted this con fab of corporate decision makers, government luminaries, diplomats, very, very important people. probably the equivalent today of, you know, some of the big events that happen in aspen and out, you know, when you see folks in shirt sleeves kind of rubbing elbows with each other. so jackson actually was coming out in august of that year, 1952, to do that. and so his professor said, you know, first he asked jackson would you come and there was a groundbreaking at the law school, would you come out and speak at that? the professor agreed. and then the professor said i'm going to arrange for you to meet him. now, the interesting thing is rehnquist did meet him and met with jackson, and jackson just kind of, didn't even rea
that will work well in your commies to mourn for the california when you are making baskets. all of these agents in the marketplace will end up coming up with new solutions, problems, meeting people's needs and so on. markets are kind of a peer network in that sense. the pure progresses differedlibs from traditional libertarians and that we don't think that market solves every problem in t society, and the many facets of they areperience that not necessarily successful assault by markets, and markets createtn their own problems. b brown's troubles and things like that. in the internet talk for buildnce, a lot of companies that were trying to build awoulf global network that would unitee computers all round the world, and they all failed compared ton this open source pier produce solutioninternet itself and theb and now wikipedia and many other things. there are places where you can use decentralized structure without involving traditional market relations, and that is what pier progressives are trying to do. >> host: what is the chicken gun? >> guest: okay, so the book starts with this kind of o
in the day, 26 -- california greater 26 of the top 500 largest companies in the world. europe has created one during that timeframe going back to the 1970s. why is in europe and japan able to produce the kind of innovation, the kind of growth, the kind of employment and the kind of middle-class became wages that the u.s. economy has produced? often people say we have entrepreneurialism in our blood, but we didn't grow our economy faster until 1992 when the commercialization of the internet. if anything our productivity was growing slower than theirs was. our product movie -- one and a half of this two-pointer coming from innovation. they move from one and half to two, to one, to one and a half. i just don't think that god blessed america with entrepreneurial blood. i think we earned it the old-fashioned way. will work harder, to more risk, made more investment if you count the salary of thinkers and innovators as part of what investment is, which our manufacturing accounting doesn't. other accountings have made those calculations and we are investing significantly more. i think we earned it.
connected to southern california because i have family in your area. grandchildren and a stepdaughter and a son-in-law that is here. so i want to affirm my connection with the l.a. region. thinking about the predicament we are in in this country today reminds me that charlie brown cartoon the one where lucey goes in the backyard and sets up a table that says psychiatry 1 cent. charlie comes up and says, he puts his penny down and she says charlie, in order for me to help analyze you and your problems, of life as a voyage on a great ocean liner. are you one of those people who takes your chair of the bowel and looks into the future to see where you're going or are you one of those people that takes your chair to the store man looks back to see where you come from and he thought a moment and said i'm having trouble getting my chair unfolded. [laughter] so here we are. i will share with you a couple of quotes from my book this one is louis brandeis. we must make our choice. we have democracy or we may have wealth concentrated in the hands of a few, but we can't have both. and then a comm
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